Six of Pentacles – Ruby Hunter

generosity, charity, community, material help, support, sharing, giving and receiving, gratitude

After living in the darkness of the Five of Pentacles Ruby Hunter was able to see the light and help others. A nurturing soul, she rose above the tragedy of being a member of the Stolen Generations to become a powerful voice for the vulnerable and offer strength to those in need.

Ruby believed that the achievement of which she was most proud was keeping her family – Roach, their two children and three foster children – together as a stable unit.

Ruby Hunter (1955-2010), singer/songwriter, was a Ngarrindjeri/ Kukatha/ Pitjantjatjara woman from South Australia. At the age of eight she and her four siblings and herself were taken from their family. She was placed in the Seaforth Children’s Home. Ruby remembered that the Government Authorities simply arrived one day in a big car, promising their grandmother that they were taking the children to the circus. At the time they were living with their grandmother on the Coorong at Meningie.

While homeless Ruby met Archie Roach, also a member of the Stolen Generations, who had drifted to Adelaide from Mildura across the Victorian border. They met at a Salvation Army drop in centre as they were both living on the street. Forming a unique friendship during their time together on the streets of Adelaide, they formed an enduring bond that would last for the rest of Ruby’s life. They were inseparable partners.

During her life Ruby worked tirelessly to support and encourage young Aboriginal people, running an open house for teenagers. Ruby and Archie together cared for 14 children in a family house group home run by the Victorian Aboriginal Child Care Agency. Later they made their own home a welcoming haven for homeless and disadvantaged young people.

Ruby was also a strong advocate against domestic violence, and a voice for the stolen generations, and between them Ruby and Archie raised many foster children with their own two boys. Ruby believed that the achievement of which she was most proud was keeping her family – Roach, their two children and three foster children – together as a stable unit. She died of a heart attack at the age of 55.